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 Post subject: Woodworking
PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2014 1:15 pm 
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I thought I'd see if there were any other woodworkers on the forum. I've been at it for a little while now and it partially explains my absence over the past year.

I started off, as many have, making improvements to the house I'd just bought and it sort of spiraled from there.

A while ago, as I moved away from carpentry to actual furniture making, I swore off power tools and have continued to work entirely by hand. It's immensely relaxing and satisfying.

I work mostly out of this dutch tool chest I built.

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 Post subject: Re: Woodworking
PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2014 11:36 pm 
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Location: Old Man Kelsey\'s Woods
I've been a wood butcher for a long time. I find I can do much more accurate work with certain power tools, but I like hands tools as well. Here is a kitchen hutch I made several years ago.
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Trip, did you cut rabbets / mortises by hand for the breadboard ends of you chest lid? I think I see some nice planes in there.

Scott


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 Post subject: Re: Woodworking
PostPosted: Sun Nov 23, 2014 8:22 am 
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Beautiful hutch, Scott. That's going to be one of my first "commissions" next year for my Aunt & Uncle who are remodeling their kitchen. It will be the largest piece I'll have built. I'm really looking forward to getting underway.

And yes - everything by hand. In fact the tool chest was the first project that was 100% hand tool. I cut the mortises using a Stanley No.45 combination plane with a 1/4" iron and then deepened it with a Lie-Nielsen router plane. I reversed the process on the breadboard with a tongue iron and then a Lie-Nielsen shoulder plan to take the shoulders down. I used a Veritas skew rabbet plane with an angled fence to raise the panel. That one really took some practice. It's the most fussy plane I've ever used.

And yes - there are some pretty nice planes tucked into the top. Here's an interior view from one of the first test fittings after I'd assembled it. It's packed with crap now!

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 Post subject: Re: Woodworking
PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2014 9:11 pm 
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^Wow, nice saws, too. I use the cheap Japanese ones. Granted, they work very well.

Post photos of future projects.

Scott


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 Post subject: Re: Woodworking
PostPosted: Sun Dec 21, 2014 2:21 pm 
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In advance of my 2015 furniture plans, I built a Nicholson bench. Work-holding on my last store-bought bench was insufficient for most hand-work. A few hold-fasts and a doe's foot and I'm in business.

First piece of furniture on the list is - unfortunately - a pallet wood project for a friend of mine to put a small aquarium on. It's paid work so I'll relent.

Next is a six board chest that will do double duty as a toy chest for my upcoming daughter and a coffee table.

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 Post subject: Re: Woodworking
PostPosted: Mon Dec 22, 2014 7:10 pm 
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^ Where's the sawdust, mounds of scrap, abandoned projects? Just kidding, I admire your housekeeping discipline. Post a picture or two of your hold downs. Are you going to use the tap-in ones like Roy Underhill uses? Did you not find a vise useful?

Looking forward to seeing your future work,

Scott

Merry Christmas / Happy Holidays, everybody!


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 Post subject: Re: Woodworking
PostPosted: Mon Dec 22, 2014 10:59 pm 
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Trip English wrote:

Next is a six board chest that will do double duty as a toy chest for my upcoming daughter and a coffee table.
You buried the lede on this one. Congrats!


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 Post subject: Re: Woodworking
PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2014 2:55 pm 
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Scott,

Yep. I'm going to be using the Gramercy hold-fasts that you knock in and out with a mallet. I may get one of the fancy screw down type from Lee Valley for detail work where a whack might knock something out of alignment, but those are about $80.

As far as vises, I had low-quality front and tail vises on my store-bought bench and I've worked on a Roubo with a leg vise and while I like them just fine they're a little cumbersome to use. Even the quick-release vises have to be screwed in. By using holdfasts and a crochet I can move the workpiece around quickly and easily.

I'll probably build a Moxon vise for dovetailing, but even that can be done with holdfasts pretty easily.

So we'll see. I haven't even drilled the dog holes yet as Santa hasn't given me clearance to open the very heavy box under the tree. (-:

And yes - I suppose I did bury the lede. I'm expecting a little girl at the end of February. She'll be my first. Didn't have my ducks in a row to build her crib, but a toy chest will be fine!


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 Post subject: Re: Woodworking
PostPosted: Fri Dec 26, 2014 12:13 pm 
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So here's the bench with a few dog holes drilled and the Gramercy holdfasts in action.

Image
First holding down a board so I can add a profile to the front edge (this is going to be an interior shelf)

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Next match planing two boards that wound up as extra support on the underside of the bench top.

For anyone who hasn't seen these things at work, they're basically just sort of candy cane shaped things that slide down into holes in the bench. When you whack the top of the candy cane with a mallet, they hold so tightly you can't move whatever they're clamping down on. When you're done you whack them in the back of the cane and they come loose. Then you just lift them out.


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 Post subject: Re: Woodworking
PostPosted: Fri Dec 26, 2014 2:42 pm 
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Very slick. I just watched the video on the Gramercy Tools web site to see how they work. Ingenious!

Oh, and congratulations on the little one! :)

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 Post subject: Re: Woodworking
PostPosted: Sun Dec 28, 2014 8:47 pm 
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Trip - Just curious - Do you use a flat stone to sharpen the molding plane iron or something else? I'm a router guy.

Scott


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 Post subject: Re: Woodworking
PostPosted: Sun Dec 28, 2014 11:33 pm 
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For convex curves like the round in the picture I use a flat stone (actually a diamond plate). For concave irons I use a slipstone.


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 Post subject: Re: Woodworking
PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2015 3:25 am 
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Congrats on the new daughter Trip!

Are you a Christopher Schwartz fan by chance? just a hunch based on your toolbox and it's contents.

I've been working as a woodworker for the past ~6 years or so, mainly/ideally do traditional construction methods with techniques that vary depending on the piece. For example, I do most all dimensioning via machine, but hand cut dovetails, mortises and tenons either by hand or some combination of bandsaw, drill press, hollow chisel mortiser and tenoning jig for a shaper depending on the project.
Do a fair amount of veneer work too, mostly in a vacuum bag.
Of course I end up taking on a lot of less challenging projects to pay the bills: crappy live edge and reclaimed projects and cheap architect and interior designer favors.

Very jealous of your lie nielsen collection there, I learned from a branch of the Edward Barnsley tree so I rely heavily on a big old stanley #7, and fill out my toolbox with mostly old stanley and veritas.
That L-N low angle jack is a revelation, that and the LN scraper plane are all I need for a finished surface when I make stuff for myself.

A moxon vice or any other way of raising the work is great for your back when cutting lots of dovetails. I learned on a quick release jorgenson so that's my vice of choice.


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 Post subject: Re: Woodworking
PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2015 10:31 am 
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Thanks, TBS. We're due at the end of Feb (though we're told our first could vary as much as two weeks early or late) and I'm finishing up some projects around the house with the expectation that my shop time will be limited to a few hours a month for the next year.

I am a fan of "The Schwarz" and have found a lot of his projects (especially since he left Pop Woodworking and has focused on publishing and teaching) are ideal for a hand-tool woodworker to get started and build skills. I was a power tool woodworker for a few years after DIY projects from my first house evolved into making terrible furniture. I rebooted this past year after moving to a house with a much smaller basement and two months of constantly rearranging stationary machines to try and move lumber around the shop and sold off most of the power tools and used the proceeds to fund an epic trip to Lie-Nielsen. I was using mostly my Granpa's jack and block planes prior to that with some random Veristas and Lie-Nielsen joinery planes.

Now the basement feels expansive and the peace and quiet of this method is ideal. I recently renovated a closet with some ship-lap pine walls and took a chop saw home from work to speed it up and could not believe the crap it spewed out even when connected to my Festool dust extractor. Needless to say I don't miss the power.

The one tool I hung onto was my thickness planer. I have it connected to a large 2HP dust collector and while it's loud as hell it doesn't spew any dust and saves me time when I have a lot of lumber to dimension. If and when I move to a larger shop I'd probably pick up an 8" jointer.

I understand you do it for a living and so perhaps the level or romance is different (or maybe the exact opposite?) but I'd love to see some of your work. Were you hobbyist before you turned pro? What lead you there?


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 Post subject: Re: Woodworking
PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2015 10:23 pm 
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TBS wrote:
I learned on a quick release jorgenson so that's my vice of choice.
Mine's bourbon, but it takes all kinds I guess. :D

Tip your waitresses, folks.

Seriously, I should show my appreciation for getting to eavesdrop on people talking about a hobby they love that I know nothing about. Really glad this is the one "clothing" forum where I keep up with the "lifestyle" boards.


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